Sunday, February 10, 2008

Britain's security-industrial complex

"Britain has a Kafkaesque oversight bureaucracy ranking with the one it purports to oversee. Some six separate surveillance monitors trip over themselves. All operate in secret and appear to be one gigantic rubber stamp. The distinction drawn by the justice secretary, Jack Straw, between 'intrusive' and 'directed' bugging, illustrates the prevailing mumbo-jumbo. The chief surveillance monitor, Sir Christopher Rose, has been asked by Straw to investigate the Khan affair, which appears to be a failure by the chief surveillance monitor. Is this to be taken seriously?" —Simon Jenkins

"This explosion of sticky-beaking, much of it done in the name of combating terrorism but even more of it not, has occurred on the watch of the same MPs now protesting their right to an almost unique degree of privacy. Their constituents are entitled to ask: and where were you when we wanted you to protect our rights? Ah, yes, in the voting lobbies, nodding them away." —Alice Miles

1 comment:

David Moss said...

Alice Miles, 6 February 2008:
"This explosion of sticky-beaking, much of it done in the name of combating terrorism but even more of it not, has occurred on the watch of the same MPs now protesting their right to an almost unique degree of privacy. Their constituents are entitled to ask: and where were you when we wanted you to protect our rights? Ah, yes, in the voting lobbies, nodding them away."

Alice Miles, 8 November 2006:
"... most of the persecuted voices howling at the thought of this Big Brother database of personal secrets hovering threateningly over the UK today seem to imagine exactly that: that they might be sufficiently significant as to be of interest to Them, and will be targeted by shadowy and malevolent agencies dedicated to the destruction of everything intrinsic to our way of life ...

Of course [the ID card] will have to be compulsory, or it will be pointless, and ministers should never have pretended otherwise. The police will have to be allowed to compel people, after stopping and fingerprinting them, to produce the card within a given time to prove their ID ..."